Can you print PDFs as PowerPoint hand outs?

I’m an university teacher and most of my lecturers put files online as either PowerPoint files or PDFs of PowerPoint handouts (3 per page with lines on the side for notes). One lecturer puts lectures up as PDFs with one slide per page. I can print it with numerous slides per page, but is there any way to have the same structure, with 3 per page and lines for notes?
Or else, what is a decent (free) program for converting PDF files to PowerPoint?
Thanks

Both PowerPoint and the Adobe PDF format are useful tools in their own right. However, the strength of the PDF format is also a hindrance when it comes to importing into PowerPoint — the PDF format is set in stone unless you have Adobe’s expensive software to edit your own PDF files. As Stephen Rindsberg says: “Converting a PPT to a PDF is like turning meat, veggies, spices and water into stew. Pretty simple. Converting a PDF to a PPT is like turning stew back into the original meat, veggies, spices and water. Darn near impossible.” Luckily, some tricks can get the content from a PDF to a PowerPoint presentation without too much trouble

 

Instructions

 

1.Conversion Software

* 1 Download conversion software to your computer, such as Advanced PDF Converter 6.0. This is trial software, so you will need to buy a license to continue using it. This is the software to use if you will be regularly converting PDFs to PowerPoint.

* 2 Upload your PDF to a file conversion website, such as Convert PDF to PowerPoint, that allows you to simply upload your PDF and receive a PowerPoint file in return. Formatting may not be preserved.

* Free PDF Converter

Download free software to convert documents www.advancedpdfconverter.com/

* 3 Convert your PDF to another Microsoft Office compatible format, or automatically remove the images, by using Free PDF Converter. While it does not directly import into PowerPoint, it does convert to Microsoft Word and Excel formats which can then be easily inserted into a PowerPoint presentation.

* 4 Copy and paste the desired areas from the PDF into PowerPoint manually. Use the “Graphics Select” tool in the Adobe PDF reader and draw a rectangle around the area you wish to import. Press “Ctrl-C” on your keyboard to copy the graphics.

* 5 Switch to PowerPoint and then press “Ctrl-V” on your keyboard to paste the selection into your presentation. Repeat for all elements of the PDF you want in PowerPoint. Be aware this can result in lower quality graphics, depending on the source material.

* 6 Adjust the zoom level of the PDF until your graphic fills the screen to achieve the highest possible resolution. However, this will only work for graphics that you wish to import into PowerPoint. Use the text select tool to copy and paste any text required.

* 7 Press the “Prnt Scrn” key on your keyboard to copy an image of everything on your computer screen when your PDF is open. Then switch to PowerPoint and press “Ctrl-V” on your keyboard to paste the image.

* 8  Simplify the process by using “Full Screen Mode” in Adobe Reader by pressing “Ctrl-L” on the keyboard, and then use “Alt-Tab” on the keyboard to switch between Adobe Reader and PowerPoint as you use the print screen key to copy and paste the elements of your PDF into PowerPoint.

* 9 Use the image tools in PowerPoint to crop the extraneous elements from the image. Click on the “Image” tab on the ribbon and then click on the “Crop” tool (it looks like a black rectangle). Drag the borders of the image until you only see what you want from the PDF. Click anywhere outside the image to finish the cropping.

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8 Responses to Can you print PDFs as PowerPoint hand outs?

  1. I like the efforts you have put in this, regards for all the great blog posts.

    • Marie says:

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    • Ammar says:

      >Looks like you are recording your thhougts/words on the powerpoint first. Should be easy to transfer the text to your word document and then pare the draft PP slides. Have you seen this ? The author discusses airpower in several low intensity conflicts. Also, can the Saudi’s use of be considered an example of “counterinsurgency” airpower?It is interesting to see your work in progress. I am a new reader, sorry if I am chiming in mid-conversation. Thanks for the Omissi referenced RAF history on one of your slides. It helped me find .

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  5. Imran says:

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